Preen By Thornton Bregazzi

DESIGNER


Preen By Thornton Bregazzi



Words by Katie Farley

After the onslaught of politically-inspired messages that unapologetically emerged from every corner of the catwalk last season, designers have since opted to channel sentiments of escapism for spring/summer 2018. That is, except for Preen By Thornton Bregazzi. The label’s first look featured a model draped in white, moralistic gauze-esque material decorated in Broderie Anglaise, and styled with a pilgrim hat and a chest embroidered capital A in big, blood red lettering; a reflection of Justin Thornton and Thea Bregazzi’s reading of The Scarlet Letter. This left the duo contemplating about their two young daughters maturing in today’s uncertain world.

A compellingly feminist display was the overall result, focusing on the history of the women’s liberation movement, “particularly in faith and religion,” explained Thornton. Further apparent elements of the collection saw an emphasis on The Handmaid’s Tale through the red bonnets and almost everything else that was featured.

A chaotic and indefinite feeling transpires as to the reality in which we are currently living in, where people have a negative outlook on faith in leaders and society. Therefore, our future could be viewed as somewhat unclear and disjointed; an idea that was echoed from Thornton. This sense of deconstruction was exemplified throughout the collection, with an amalgam of skirts, sweaters, and dresses appearing as though they resembled sections of a puzzle being pieced together in a haphazard fashion. Who could ignore the obvious comparisons made to Galliano? The undone look was consistent amid the girl’s ungroomed hair and barely-there makeup.

Attires were fragile and airy, with flyaway kinds of cotton, chiffon, tulle, silks, laces and many diaphanous fabrics that arrived irregularly layered and carelessly styled (on purpose, of course). Despite the disordered shaping’s and silhouettes, a wave of femininity featured amid the dainty, botanical prints, the fluidity of fabrics and soft pastel shades.

Thornton additionally added, “we want women to deconstruct their own femininity and reconstruct it however they want, so they can be whatever they want” The designer concluded, “we talked about feminism in terms of femininity: how women should embrace their femininity and not feel as if they can’t show it.”

 
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